Blog


30 Dec
2016

How To Help Children With Learning Limitations

Whether you feel your child/children may have learning limitations or not, or whether you would like to help them practise sensible strategies, that work, you can follow a few simple ideas.

Children with learning limitations need: –

  • A multi-sensory approach: visual – see, auditory – hear, tactile – feel

  • An environment that is quiet, calm, structured, consistent and fair

  • Short, simple instructions

  • Time to process, respond, do work, finish work

  • Structured work that is systematic and methodical

  • Direct, specific, explicit teaching

  • Checklists

  • Self-correcting materials and programs

  • Colours for checking, recording, matching, highlighting

  • Quick feedback about their work

They need to be shown from big – little, easy – hard, simple – complex, concrete – abstract, visual – auditory

 

They need to be taught with a system, routine, structure and method.

28 Dec
2016

Technology for Learning

Dear Parents,

Technology represents breakthroughs and advances in human achievement that can be used for many practical purposes.

Technology for learning is a great tool, but not a master. Parents and teachers can lead the way in children’s learning by using technology to support enhance and accelerate children’s education.

In classrooms and homes, technology for children provides an exciting and engaging means of teaching children. It can allow for acceleration of the learning process and make written tasks simpler.

Technology needs to be purposeful. Learning on a computer, iPad or tablet needs to be relevant to curriculum work and reinforce and extend school learning.

At school, teachers can use technology to improve learning by integrating it with the curriculum and teaching practices.

At home, parents can use technology to help their children gain knowledge skills and to use time meaningfully. 

Technology is a great resource, but will never take the place of loving parents and effective and dedicated teachers.

 

      

28 Dec
2016

Is This App Suitable for my Child?

Dear Parents,

Here are some guidelines to help you evaluate the suitability of educational apps.

Apps need to be:-

 

  • written by teachers/educators
  • engaging
  • a fun way to learn
  • innovative
  • multi-sensory
  • structured
  • systematic
  • high-quality
  • directed at learning outcomes
  • suitable for home or school
  • reinforcement of school learning
  • portable
  • priced reasonably
  • easy to understand
  • not a waste of time
  • focused on tasks

Apps need to have:-

 

  • quality content
  • progress tracking
  • age-appropriate material
  • structure
  • an easy and simple system
  • parental guidelines
  • feedback systems for correction
  • no advertising components
  • interactive elements
  • success and achievement in-built

 

28 Dec
2016

What are the habits of a great worker?

Most of the following may seem obvious. However, it’s helpful to have lists for you and your children to refer to. At least with some standards, you and your children can move in that direction.

  1. Read every day

  2. Write every day

  3. Do homework

  4. Work at a desk

  5. Sit up straight

  6. Plan work

  7. Get organised

  8. Keep to time

  9. Check over work

  10. Do your best

  11. Listen to instructions

  12. Finish work

  13. Write neatly

  14. Have a margin

  15. Underline headings

  16. Have a diary

  17. Pay attention

  18. Be positive about school work

  19. Expect to do well

  20. Revise work

26 Feb
2016

Is Your Child Ready for Starting School?

Most 4-5 year olds will be anticipating going to ‘big school’ soon. Most of you with 4-5 year olds, are probably concerned about your child’s readiness for formal education.

Here are some quick ways of identifying your child’s current abilities.

If you can tick a ‘yes’ to all or most of these skills, your child is on track to succeed in Kindergarten.

Reading

  • writes own name

  • tells a story from pictures

  • shares reading with you

  • recognises common signs when out and about

  • retells familiar stories

  • gives an opinion about stories

  • links stories with personal experiences

Sounds

  • hears the same letter sound in two words example: cat, call

  • knows some letter names example: A,B,C,

  • repeats familiar verses, rhymes and jingles

  • notices rhyming words in verses and songs

Speaking

  • answers questions

  • understands instructions

  • has a conversation

  • retells personal experiences

  • speaks fluently

  • uses words well

  • uses topic words about topics of interest

Writing

  • scribbles

  • writes own name

  • holds pencils and crayons

 

Pack your school bag and good luck! All will work out well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most 4-5 year olds will be anticipating going to ‘big school’ soon. Most of you with 4-5 year olds, are probably concerned about your child’s readiness for formal education.

 

Here are some quick ways of identifying your child’s current abilities. If you can tick a ‘yes’ to all or most of these skills, your child is on track to succeed in Kindergarten.

 

Reading

 

. writes own name

. tells a story from pictures

. shares reading with you

. recognises common signs when out and about

. retells familiar stories

. gives an opinion about stories

. links stories with personal experiences

 

Sounds

 

. hears the same letter sound in two words example: cat, call

. knows some letter names example: A,B,C,

. repeats familiar verses, rhymes and jingles

. notices rhyming words in verses and songs

 

Speaking

 

. answers questions

. understands instructions

. has a conversation

. retells personal experiences

. speaks www.priceofcialis.com fluently

. uses words well

. uses topic words about topics of interest

 

Writing

 

. scribbles

. writes own name

. holds pencils and crayons

 

Pack your school bag and good luck! All will work out well.

 

 

 

15 Feb
2016

Your role in your child's learning

You might wonder what role you play in your children’s learning and education. You might question what you cialisdailyuse – this website can do to assist them in their schooling.

Look no further.

You are the answer.

Your role as a parent is the primary source of your child’s language use, values, attitudes, choices of friends and potential for his or her approach to school and success. Along the way, I know you would hope for teachers who are effective, knowledgeable and influential. Someone will be extraordinary; some will be ordinary; most are in between and great.

You are the constant in your children’s lives. You can help create a home environment that is extraordinarily effective, knowledgeable and influential. You are your children’s best role model.

Here are 5 simple ideas to produce extraordinary results:

 

  1. Watch the news together, then talk about it.

  2. Turn off the TV.

  3. Read together – a bit each night – take turns.

  4. Give children jobs around the house.

  5. Talk about your days at work and school.

13 Feb
2016

Understanding your child's school report

All of you would have received your child’s/children’s reports for each year of their schooling. Understanding what they mean may be a concern for some parents.

Most children, about 70%, will perform, function and be graded as ‘at class level’. This may be labelled as C, Sound, Satisfactory or other terms. This means that your child is on track for the class, having achieved that class level of academic development.

Within that group, there will be much variation, from lower C to upper C. This could mean that your child is functioning very well within the class. It could also mean that another child may be just attaining class level.

A simple way of understanding standardised reporting is:-

A – 2%  – Well above class level

B – 14% – Above class level

C – 68% – At class level

D – 14% – Below class level

E – 2% – Well below class level

Here is an important point.

You may think if your child is at C level in mid-year and C level at the end of year/grade, that he/she has not improved.

It means that your child is managing class/grade level work and has maintained that position at mid-year and end of year.

Depending on the particular school’s composition, there may be variations in results that affect school performance. This could vary due to location, language backgrounds, parents’ educational background, www.medicine20.org resources, allocation of funding and other factors.

11 Feb
2016

Education & Testing: Do They Meet?

I’m quite sure that most of you get nervous when the time comes for your child’s sitting for NAPLAN.

Let’s take a look priceofcialis at what education is meant to be and what standardised testing does. You be the judge as to whether education and testing ever meet.

EducationSlide1Standardised Testing

Slide1

07 Feb
2016

Should Children Be Masters or Winners?

You might think both. You might think neither.

Either way, for children to be the best they can be and master the challenges, is more important than winning.

Children naturally want to learn and understand. site – www.cialisdailyuse.com Their full and thorough engagement in tasks will lead to mastery.

On the other hand, performing for good grades, competition, results, trying to please others or trying to outperform their peers, may lead to individual and social comparisons and disappointments.

Your children need to experience success in terms of: –

learning

achieving

progressing and

striving

 

They need to engage/be involved with activities that: –

 relate to school work

are worthy of their time and effort

build on previous knowledge

provide opportunities for learning and

build their independence

Success and engagement will lead to mastery.

With mastery will come confidence and selfreliance.

Your child will flourish and be the person they’re meant to be.

04 Feb
2016

Not all children function at class level

You might be thinking that the work you see your children do is too easy or too hard.

The secret is understanding your child’s functioning work level, then matching the most suitable materials.

How can you assess this?

 

Rate these areas of performance by giving points from 1 to 5 to gain a picture of your child.

  1. Reading competently with speed, accuracy and expression.

  2. Following written instructions with 95% accuracy.

  3. Speeding up with class work and managing time

  4. Working independently, being organised and managing with success.

  5. Writing, speaking and listening with assurance.

 

What do your results show?

Scores 1 to 12: Your child needs patience, step-by-step instructions, time to develop, and materials that match his/her ability at a younger than current class level.

Scores 13 to 20: Your child is managing http://medicine20.org/ at class level and needs materials for that grade that will reinforce class learning.

Scores 20 to 25: Your child needs to master class level work and be challenged by some extension materials.

Remember, for every child, the work should be not too easy and not too hard; it should be just right!